The ways that seasons affect what music is in your ears and why it matters 

By Piper Gaul

Piper.Gaul@franklincollege.edu

The days are growing shorter and the sun seems to be shy. Finals are creeping up and with that comes stress and less time to do things you enjoy. 

Because of this, upbeat songs feel out of touch and almost annoying. Winter

is a time for new, sadder songs to hit the airwaves. Because of the demand for the bops to be a bit bluer, artists that lean toward sadder music often release content around the winter months. 

With seasonal depression set to affect 10 million Americans this year alone, according to the American Family Physician, many of us will be looking for songs that say “it’s grey outside, and I’m here to let you cry about it.” 

Senior Jackie List, whose taste in music stays pretty consistent year-round, said that she even gets bummed out by the weather. “[Sometimes the season bothers me] because I enjoy being active and being able to freely go from place to place,” List said. “It’s hard sometimes, though, because I don’t like being cold.” 

So, while “Someone You Loved” by Lewis Capaldi plays and Mariah Carey’s “All I Want for Christmas” is queued up, maybe take a moment to think about the way we use seasons to determine taste. 

During the summer, there’s a rush for artists to put out songs that all compete for the title of “Top Summer Jam.” These are the songs you want to sing with the windows down. Songs like the Jonas Brothers’ “Sucker” and “Truth Hurts” by Lizzo work best with sunshine and confidence. 

In the winter, while we have the obvious holiday albums, there are the few albums that come out with the intentions of being very vulnerable and emotional. The 1975, a band that has a few genres under their belt but are usually described as indie pop and alternative, released their album “A Brief Inquiry Into Online Relationships” in late November 2018. They are considered a very emotional band that deals with a lot of sensitive topics that don’t seem appropriate for the summertime. 

Without incredibly loyal fans, poor timing could cost an artist severely. This is why so many musicians decide to release content in the summer. It is easier to guarantee that a catchy beat will be enough to make a song popular. By putting out music in the winter, an artist is trusting people to genuinely connect with the lyrics and tone set in the songs. It’s riskier, and there are not many examples of artists who are willing to do it. 

With winter fast approaching, music that makes us feel warm and comfortable is important. Artists who happily release music like that at this time of the year are the type of musicians that are not just in it for the fame or money. They want to create a feeling. That’s what music is about. 

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